DECEMBER 2019




MINIMAL ACTION 9

- background info
- "drop-in and i will pay you $15/hour.."
- end of the project


MINIMAL ACTION 8

SOCIAL JUSTICE ABOUT ODSP/OW
short August 2019 project by a group of 9 people
towards interviews by social justice writer Laurie Monsebraaten


MINIMAL ACTION 7

Freedom Of Information request
to know who Minister Lisa MacLeod did consult before announcing
that she will change the definition of disability


MINIMAL ACTION 6



Visit to NDP MPP Joel Harden, official critic for disability and accessibility
Queen's Park, March 6, 2019
content of the package brought to Joel Harden


MINIMAL ACTION 5

Ethical guidelines for the collection of contributions
by people with lived experience of poverty (and disability)

by claude wittmann and Heath Soave


MINIMAL ACTION 4

100 postcards in response to
Minister Lisa MacLeod's November 22nd, 2018 announcement


52 cards were sent from: Cripping the Arts, January 24-26, 2019
and the rest were sent by allies the week after, so the 100 cards are gone.

if you want to print your own cards:
- please send an email to minimalaction2019@gmail.com
- or use these high resolution files: front back



MINIMAL ACTION 3
letters to Members of Provincial Parliament (MPPs)
by individuals with lived experience of disability+poverty and allies
+
delivery of this action and MINIMAL ACTION 2 to MPP Lisa Gretzky and Minister Lisa MacLeod,
at Queen's Park, on October 30, 2018


MINIMAL ACTION 2
sharing of stories/opinions by individuals
with lived experience of poverty+disability
in response to Minister MacLeod's July 31st, 2018 announcements

MINIMAL ACTION 1
request for quotes to include in a NOW magazine opinion published on September 20, 2018.


MINIMAL ACTION is work that comes from a deep insight/teaching that says "i am no home". it is a series of actions done in response to our current provincial government's abrasive handling of social assistance, poverty and disability. the actions are called minimal because they are tiny compared to the massive overpowering we experience on social assistance, because they are the least and the most we can do as gestures that foster self-respect without falling into ableist activism, because they are close to the flesh and survival that our minds have learnt to be reduced to through our socio-economic paths, because they are trying to invent the dignity and the sense of belonging that most of us do not know or feel.

claudewittmann.ca